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More Modernist Recipes

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Orange-Ginger Gel Sheets

Agar gelatin sheets 2

One interesting use of modernist gelling is to create pliable gel sheets. These gel sheets are made by adding a combination of agar agar and gelatin to a flavored liquid and letting it set. The agar and gelatin add both elasticity for strength and a nice brittleness for flavor release. The ratio of the two ingredient will determine the final characteristic of the gel sheets.

These gel sheets are very versatile. They can be cut into wide strips and used as a wrapper for sushi. You can cut them into squares and use them as a pseudo wonton wrapper. You can use round cookie cutters and make flavored "crepes" that hold either sweet or savory dishes. You can also just drape them over vegetables or stir fried meat.

In this recipe I use an orange and ginger flavored liquid but you can use any flavors you want for the dish you are creating. Most fruit juices are great for sweet sheets. Curries or herb infusions are wonderful with savory dishes.

Orange-Ginger Sheets Tools Needed

If you like this recipe you can get more than 80 other recipes from my book Modernist Cooking Made Easy: Getting Started. The book covers many of the popular modernist techniques such as gelling, spherification, and foams. It also explores modernist ingredients like agar, sodium alginate, tapioca maltodextrin, and xanthan gum. It is all presented in an easy to understand format and I think it's the best way to learn about modernist cooking.

Also, if you are just getting started experimenting with molecular gastronomy and modernist cuisine then I highly recommend one of these molecular gastronomy kits. They have everything you need to do many different dishes.

Like this recipe?
Have questions or comments about it?
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Orange-Ginger Sheets Recipe

  • Published: January 3, 2013
  • By Jason Logsdon
  • Prep Time: 15 Minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes active time
Orange ginger agar sheet 2

Orange-Ginger Sheets Ingredients


250 grams orange juice, preferably fresh
50 mm / 2" piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
3.0 gram agar, 1.2%

2 gelatin sheets or 1/2 powdered gelatin packet, 1.4%

Orange-Ginger Sheets Instructions

If using sheet gelatin, place it in a bowl of cold water to bloom. If using powdered gelatin combine it with 50 grams of water and 100 grams of orange juice. Let the gelatin bloom for 5 to 10 minutes.

While the gelatin is blooming place the remaining orange juice, ginger, and red pepper flakes in a pot. Bring to a simmer, remove from the heat and let steep for 10 minutes. Strain the orange juice and return to the pot.

Sprinkle in the agar and mix well with an immersion blender. Bring to a simmer while stirring occasionally. Let simmer for 3 to 5 minutes then remove from the heat.

If using powdered gelatin, whisk in the water-orange juice mixture and let dissolve. If using sheet gelatin, squeeze out the water and add the sheets, whisking them into the agar mixture until they dissolve.

Spoon some of the gel base onto the flat, plastic surface, tipping the surface until the gel evenly coats it. Let the sheet set, it should only take a few minutes, and then the gel sheet will be ready to use.

Interested in more information like this?

Modernist Cooking Made Easy: Getting Started covers many of the popular modernist techniques such as gelling, spherification, and foams. It also explores modernist ingredients like agar, sodium alginate, tapioca maltodextrin, and xanthan gum.

It is all presented in an easy to understand format along with more than 80 recipes and photographs.

I might be biased but I think
it's the best way to learn about modernist cooking!
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